Tag Archives: 1980s

Modern Romance (Albert Brooks, 1981)

Albert Brooks’ comedy in this film dances, with dainty and brilliant precision, on beats both awkward and absurd; we cringe in wincing recognition, hoping not to catch a glimpse of ourselves at the corners of our clenched eyelids, at the … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Pit (Lew Lehman, 1981)

The final act of this film plays like a meeting of the Ewoks and the redneck posse from Night of the Living Dead, wherein actors wearing bearsuits ramble through the woods before being pierced with bullets and punctured with racist … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Forest (Don Jones, 1982)

In an inversion of the process of scratching moss off a fallen tree limb, scratching the exterior of this ostensible killer-in-the-woods film leads to a fuzzier, fragrant, and fertile interior. Two couples, both with dysfunctions ranging from casual chauvinism to … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The Stunt Man (Richard Rush, 1980)

With Steve Railsback channeling Charles Manson; Peter O’Toole Deus ex machinating while perched on a crane-mounted director’s chair; a cast of secondary players whose overlapping dialogue and excesses of quirky heartfelt humanity rivals the best of 1970s Altman; and a … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Terror at Tenkiller (Ken Meyer, 1986)

Remarkably, as much (if not more) screen time and dialogue is given over to the domestic violence narrative of this pedestrian low-budget killer-in-the-woods film as to the generic slasher-stalks-his-prey narrative. Yet herein lies two strange disconnects: the real-world subject of … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Sledgehammer (David A. Prior, 1983)

This film deserves to be seen as the ne plus ultra of slasher films not only because of its content (one-note teenager-manqués obsessed with sexing and partying, single-setting remote location whose locale is described via tedious explication, flimsy origin story, … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maniac (William Lustig, 1980)

If one were to take the measure of filmic representations of America in the 1970s, then one should surely plumb the depths to include films like this one, a celluloid scraping from the filthiest strata of the cinematic shale. While … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Witchboard (Kevin S. Tenney, 1986)

Carol J. Clover, by way of illustrating that the subtext of occult films is generally about men in crisis, has previously done dominating work deconstructing the relationship between the two male protagonists in this film. Yet what’s ironic is that … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Night of the Demons (Kevin S. Tenney, 1988)

Apart from an astonishing out-of-left-field solo dance sequence, performed in hyperbolic strobe-lit Kate Bush style (and set to Bauhaus’ “Stigmata Martyr”), some innovative camerawork (cribbed, perhaps, from the demoncam in Evil Dead 2), and an exhortation to “eat a bowl … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

They Live (John Carpenter, 1988)

There’s a telling moment in this film when its nonponymous protagonist (Roddy! Piper!) glances through purloined sunglasses at a television on which a ghoulitician mouths empty Reagan-era doublespeak, and sighs, “figures it’d be something like this.” Very soon after this … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment