Tag Archives: 1970s

Messiah of Evil (William Huyck, 1973)

A cabal of ghouls lurks bloodily in the meat section in the neon-lit supermarket. A shadow perches in the front seat of the dark Buick in the garage. A vermin-eating giant waits in anticipation behind the unbuilt facades of the … Continue reading

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Alucarda (Alucarda, la hija de las tinieblas) (Juan López Moctezuma, 1978)

Considering the shrieking and bug-eyed gurning that the titular Tina Romero does in this film, one would be forgiven if one thought she was actually possessed by Beelzebub or trying desperately hard to convince someone off-screen that they made a … Continue reading

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The Velvet Vampire (Stephanie Rothman, 1971)

Hard to read either as a winking deconstruction of the vampire film or as a sun-fried reimagining of its tropes, this film both giggles in its hands—tittering at its characters named (Carl) Stoker and (Diane) Le Fanu; smirking at its … Continue reading

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House (Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1977)

Less a film than an anarchic rummage through the possibilities of the medium, this truly mind-blowing one-of-a-kind experimental art-horror explosion embeds a family drama within a coming-of-age story within a spookhouse tale within a ghost story. As its seven final … Continue reading

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Tourist Trap (David Schmoeller, 1979)

Neither calmly sitting in the lap of the slasher film, nor quietly cradled in the bosom of the supernatural thriller, this film is nonetheless a pleasant child; its evocative use of setting, its cheapjack convincing aesthetic, its inventive sound design, … Continue reading

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The Seven-Ups (Philip D’Antoni, 1973)

The car chase at the midpoint of this cops-and-mobsters film is a marvel; its camera movement and framing, its impeccable editing, and its sparing use of sound (including revving engines, humming tires, and expletive-mumbling Roy Scheider), leads one to make … Continue reading

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Overlord (Stuart Cooper, 1975)

Part Imperial War Museum archival documentary, part impressionistic meditation on mortality, part traditional war narrative, this film really is like nothing that came before or, one thinks, will come after. Its gestation–director Stuart Cooper and cinematographer John Alcott tried obsessively, … Continue reading

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Gumshoe (Stephen Frears, 1971)

Is it any wonder that a man (so marvelously portrayed by Albert Finney), living in a drab flat emboldened by the green and white spines of Penguin crime, would leave one life, where the smell of the greasepaint barely covers … Continue reading

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Fat City (John Huston, 1972)

This film’s opening sequence–where the remarkable Stacy Keach melts on his bed in droopy underwear, inserts a lazy cigarette in his nickel-slot of a mouth, lurches around and rummages through his sweaty room in search of a match, collapses frustratedly … Continue reading

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Keoma (Enzo G. Castellari, 1976)

Into a windswept desert town suffering two plagues, a literal one for which they are denied medical care, and a figurative one caused by ex-soldiers who no longer have war and capitalists whose desire for power and a docile populace … Continue reading

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